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Ataxia Support Network

Muscles in my leg hurts


#21

I'm beginning to think using a walking stick actually does make my gait worse. Possibly the

height of the stick is wrong making me lean too much the wrong way?

My leg muscles ache too, what really bothers me is when my ankles give way on stairs.

I was told it was nothing to worry about!


#22

Hi Beryl,

I had to go to my sons open house. So I took a cane so people would know something wrong. I could not get the rhythm of using it. So I carried it most of the time. But a lot of people use them. So it must just be me.

Beryl Park said:

I'm beginning to think using a walking stick actually does make my gait worse. Possibly the

height of the stick is wrong making me lean too much the wrong way?

My leg muscles ache too, what really bothers me is when my ankles give way on stairs.

I was told it was nothing to worry about!


#23

Hi Randy, Of course I 2nd what Rose say and wanted to add that my pain in my legs seem to come back stronger and more often if I don't eat a banana everyday.

I was told by Dr. Tom Clouse that the leg paiin is just your body telling you that you need more oxygen in your legs. For every 10 mins of exercising you can get a 2 hr repreave of pain. So when I get any ake that's my clue to get moving how ever I can, weather it's just streching sitting or on a treadmil or even better outside while you get some fresh air in your lungs at the same time. I love killing 2 virds with one stone! :0)


#24

My backhurts and my legs get tired easily, and hurt if i push any farther than that. The cold weather makes everything STIFF, and then i walk like frankenstein. i also find that stress makes everything move alot choppier and less smooth. The only thing i hav found that works on my tremendous muscular back pain is narcotics from the Doc, and cortizone injections.


#25

My doctor gave me Cortizone but it wasn't helping after awhile so he stopped them. I find that Oxycotin tablets taken with panadol helps.


#26

Hi Lori!

I have no proper rhythm, it seems to make me jerkier, and more unstable. But I take one when I

go out because of the number of near falls I've had missing kerbs, and having to encounter

unexpected slopes in pavements.

Lori said:

Hi Beryl,

I had to go to my sons open house. So I took a cane so people would know something wrong. I could not get the rhythm of using it. So I carried it most of the time. But a lot of people use them. So it must just be me.

Beryl Park said:

I'm beginning to think using a walking stick actually does make my gait worse. Possibly the

height of the stick is wrong making me lean too much the wrong way?

My leg muscles ache too, what really bothers me is when my ankles give way on stairs.

I was told it was nothing to worry about!


#27

Hello Everyone,

I wanted to mention my exprience using a walking stick (cane). I found myself tripping over the cane ocassionally either that or my balance would be on the otherside where the cane was needed. Balance was thown off to much using the cane. Then decided to try a four wheel walker where I can hang onto handles in both hands and walk free and easy now. The feeling of both hands helping me balance to walk is such a comfort to me. I no longer tense up while walking. If I get tired of walking it has a seat to sit on and under the seat I store my purse. Love this gadget so much. Folds up so easily and is light to place in he car. I take it everywhere with me. Vickie



Lockie said:

Hi randy,
This sounds similar to my experience. My physiotherapist explained it being my change in walking with a different gait. The ache was because the wrong muscles were becoming involved in me walking and she gave me exercises to strengthen the muscles that were wasting as a result. This does help. I began walking with a stick when out, primarily for safety but also to let others know that I was disabled and to give me room. It's actually less embarrassing as it was obvious I wasn't drunk. Walking with a stick does cause back and shoulder pains. I now take a load of painkillers but still get about and always try to get a walk in.
All the best.

#28

Hi Vickie!

I trip over my walking stick too. At the moment I don't have a rollator/walker but whenever I'm at

the supermarket I get that same sense of freedom pushing a trolley.

My leg/arm muscles ache on the side I lean on the walking stick, it tends to make my posture worse.

A friend loaned me some walking poles, I need to practice with those but first impressions are they

do improve posture and gait. xB

Vickie Welsh said:

Hello Everyone,

I wanted to mention my exprience using a walking stick (cane). I found myself tripping over the cane ocassionally either that or my balance would be on the otherside where the cane was needed. Balance was thown off to much using the cane. Then decided to try a four wheel walker where I can hang onto handles in both hands and walk free and easy now. The feeling of both hands helping me balance to walk is such a comfort to me. I no longer tense up while walking. If I get tired of walking it has a seat to sit on and under the seat I store my purse. Love this gadget so much. Folds up so easily and is light to place in he car. I take it everywhere with me. Vickie



Lockie said:

Hi randy,
This sounds similar to my experience. My physiotherapist explained it being my change in walking with a different gait. The ache was because the wrong muscles were becoming involved in me walking and she gave me exercises to strengthen the muscles that were wasting as a result. This does help. I began walking with a stick when out, primarily for safety but also to let others know that I was disabled and to give me room. It's actually less embarrassing as it was obvious I wasn't drunk. Walking with a stick does cause back and shoulder pains. I now take a load of painkillers but still get about and always try to get a walk in.
All the best.

#29


#30

Rose! Thank You so much for posting that!!! My muscle and knee pain has been so bad lately! Lots of giving out and extreme pain. It's been making it so hard to keep up my exercise program! I couldn't figure out why it had gotten so bad all of a sudden but then your post about the COq10. I had stopped taking mine because I'd been feeling so well. Now I will get back on it and see what happens!!! :-)))

rose said:

Hi Randy, I was diagnosed with Sporadic Cerebellar Ataxia 10 years ago, and 3 years ago I started using a cane, to prevent falls. I do agree with Patsy though, 2 walking sticks (trekking poles) would give more stability. When I go walking, I use 2 trekking poles. Anyway, yes I do have muscle pain, although it's not NEARLY as bad as it use to be, as I take 600 mg of CoQ10 (300 mg am, 300 mg pm) daily. I take a statin drug for high cholesteral, and originally started taking CoQ10 for a side effect of achy muscles (muscles make CoQ10 i believe). My neurologist upped the amount to 600 mg. Also, I stretch my muscles and do exercises for strength and balance each day, as well as attend physical therapy 2 days weekly. My theory is that muscles tend to ache and get tight due to weakness and gait. And age compounds this, as I'm 59 years young...,ha! Of course, always check with you doctor before taking anything! My best to you...,;o)


#31

Hi All.

I suffer with excruciating ankle ,knee and calf pain as well. Although it can be a side effect of Ataxia, my Physio said that because we all walk "Dodgy" it puts extra pressure on the muscles behind the knee and those that run up the ankle. She gave me exercises too but they didn't really help. I went from a cane to an elbow crutch and have found that I don't trip over it as much and you can weight bear a bit more. I'ts also a welcome help when you can't reach something in a supermarket.

Swimming also helps with muscle pain but not too much or else you get the dreaded "spastic like" spasms which are worse than the ankle and calf pain. Hey ho, we don't have much going for us do we. Have a great day every one. It's nearly the weekend. xx


#32

This article might help some:

Muscles can become sore for a multitude of reasons. Whether you’re sore from a recent workout or you simply slept the wrong way, your muscles can react to the unusual movement and become tight and stiff. But not to worry -- there are stretches to help soothe your soreness.

Before intense stretching, it’s best to warm up the body with a brisk walk or jog for 5 to 10 minutes -- just to loosen your muscles and maximize the benefits of your stretching. Never stretch further than what is comfortable for you.

For sore biceps:

Stand with your back about arm's length away from a wall. “Start off standing with good posture and extend your right arm straight back, with a straight elbow,” suggests Marilyn Moffat, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Therapy at New York University. Press the back of your right hand against the wall. Once you are comfortable, gently bend your knees to really feel the release and stretch in the bicep. Hold for 30-60 seconds and then repeat with the other arm (if needed).

For sore triceps:

“This stretch you can do sitting or standing, as long as you are in good postural alignment,” says Moffat. Start by reaching your right hand up over your head. Then bring your hand down toward the middle of your back -- go as far as comfortably possible. If you need more of a stretch, gently push down on the right elbow with your left hand. Hold for 30-60 seconds.

For sore shoulders:

This is another stretch you can do either sitting or standing. Start with your chin tucked in. Reach your right arm up and let your right hand reach toward the middle of your back. Your elbow should be behind your head, your right palm should be touching your body and your fingers should be pointing downward. Then, reach your left arm out to the side and bring your left hand toward the middle of your back with your palm facing outward and fingers pointing upward. Try to touch or overlap your middle fingers. This will make the shoulders move in their general range of motion and help release any built up tension.

For sore calves:

Stand facing a wall and place the ball of your foot up against it. Lean your hips and chest into the wall and hold for a slow count of 20. Repeat two more times.

“It’s good because it gets the calf and the Achilles tendon, and tightness in this area can increase the risk of plantar fasciitis or heel spurs,” Michele Olson, Ph.D., a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine.

For sore thighs:

Get in a lunge with your right leg behind you. Gently place your right knee, shin and front of foot down on the floor. Squeeze your glutes, lean forward onto the front leg and tuck your pelvis under you.

“This is an excellent stretch for the front of the thigh and hip flexors. Many individuals with tight quads and hip flexors have difficulty squatting down to pick up their purses or common items such as groceries bags and end up straining the back muscles.”

For a sore butt:

Sit on the floor with straight legs. Bend your left leg, and bring your left foot to the outside of your right leg. Rotate your torso so you are facing the left. Use your right arm to pull your left thigh inward. “You will feel an amazing stretch in the deep gluteals," Olson says. Repeat on the opposite side.

For sore abs:

Lay face down and place your hands under your shoulders. Press up on your forearms to lift your upper body away from the floor. Look straight ahead.

“This move will stretch your abs and allow your spine to reposition itself, helping you to keep a balance between the abs muscles on the front of your trunk and your back muscles along the spine,” Olson says.

For a sore upper back:

“Try the ‘fake hug’ stretch,” suggests Liz DiAlto, a fitness and lifestyle coach in New York City. You can do this standing or seated. With your spine in a neutral position, reach your arms forward (parallel to the ground) and grab each elbow with the opposite hand. Once you're in this position, drop your head (let it hang naturally), then round your upper back and gently pull on each elbow. Play around with this to feel the stretch in different areas of the upper back. You can pull side to side or up and down. When you find the position that feels like the best stretch for you, hold it there.

By Ashley Victor E health Sept 20 2013


#33

John,

Hi. I have SCA8 and am also from Dallas. Was wondering if you would share which doctor you see.

Thank you,
Piper