I have a question about the COVID vaccine

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:woozy_face: Too late for me…I’m having it tomorrow.

By way of reassurance I would like to mention that I had my first Covid jab 4 weeks ago. I have had no bad reactions, no funny aches nor any other symptons. So far so good. Looking forward to my top up jab…

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:slightly_smiling_face: I’ve been fine, nothing to complain about, the sore arm was barely noticeable.
My husband (no ataxia) has had mild flu symptoms.
We both had the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine.

It’s my understanding that the second shot [booster] can be a little troublesome. However, it’s been said in the news that it’s the immune system antibodies working from the first shot.

Had my second vaccine shot (booster) yesterday. So far, no problem except arm pain. Fingers crossed!

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My niece had a minor temperature and feeling out of sorts after her second shot. About 14 hours later! But she felt fine the next day. She just took a couple of Tylenol. :smiley:

MY SUGGESTION TO ALL IF YOUR DOCTOR APPROVES: GET THE VACCINE SHOT. YOU DON’T WANT THE COVID VIRUS! VACCINE APPEARS TO HAVE NO ILL EFFECTS. :wink: Just know that the vaccine does not prevent you from getting the virus. The vaccine only stops it from getting to a very serious point - fingers crossed.

Hi all,

Am having a vaccine tomorrow due to my health conditions am a bit nervous actually but I have always said that if I got offered one I would take it I will keep you updated on how it goes and that but it might not be for a couple of days afterward

My husband just got his 2nd Pfizer dose this past week. He had pretty bad flu like symptoms intermittently for several days afterward. It was a hard few days. He was required to consent to it and to bi weekly tests for his job (which has no contact with the public).

From December 2019 to March 2020, he and I and our then 5-6 year old were strangely sick with what was first called a stomach virus, then flu A, then walking pneumonia with a rash (for our son), with residual fatigue and shortness of breath for both me and my son for months afterward. I was hospitalized within hours of first getting sick in 2019. I couldn’t walk or talk anymore. We were all three treated aggressively, no questioned asked, never tested back then. Still haven’t been antibody tested. I think we had it and thas why my husband’s reaction to the vaccine was so strong.

My husband wants me to take the vaccine and so does my neurologist but I will not. Purposefully triggering a dramatic immune response in myself is more likely to wreck my ataxia than re exposure to something I think I already had. No way am I going to trust science with my rare disease when they are always admitting to us that they are just guessing.

However. MRNA has been murmured for years to be a possible treatment for us. So if this works out maybe other treatment options will open up later.

I had a bad reaction to the flu vaccine last year, it lasted 48hrs. This made me apprehensive about having the Covid vaccine. But to my surprise I was ok :slightly_smiling_face: After the 1st vaccination all I noticed was a barely sore arm, and after the 2nd I had no after effects whatsoever.

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Generally speaking, people who had covid are having a worse reaction to the first vaccine, because it’s acting like a booster. In terms of whether or not you get the vaccine. . . . I heard something interesting on a medical call in show yesterday, from NYU. They were basically saying that if the level of covid in the community is low, that the potential risks of the vaccine may well outweigh the risks for someone who has a concerning condition. But that if the level of covid in the community increases, that the more real risk of the disease may well outweigh the risk of potential vaccine side effects. Something to think about, that you could consider using this to guide your decision/timing.

Sharon from ModSupport

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