Climbing fibers in spinocerebellar ataxia: A mechanism for the loss of motor control

APA
Smeets, C. J. L. M., & Verbeek, D. S. (2016). Climbing fibers in spinocerebellar ataxia: A mechanism for the loss of motor control. Neurobiology of Disease, 88, 96-106. DOI: 10.1016/j.nbd.2016.01.009
Author
Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S / Climbing fibers in spinocerebellar ataxia : A mechanism for the loss of motor control.
In: Neurobiology of Disease, Vol. 88, 04.2016, p. 96-106.
Scientific - peer-review › Article
Harvard
Smeets, CJLM & Verbeek, DS 2016, ‘Climbing fibers in spinocerebellar ataxia: A mechanism for the loss of motor control’ Neurobiology of Disease, vol 88, pp. 96-106. DOI: 10.1016/j.nbd.2016.01.009
Standard
Climbing fibers in spinocerebellar ataxia : A mechanism for the loss of motor control. / Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S.
In: Neurobiology of Disease, Vol. 88, 04.2016, p. 96-106.
Scientific - peer-review › Article
Vancouver
Smeets CJLM, Verbeek DS. Climbing fibers in spinocerebellar ataxia: A mechanism for the loss of motor control. Neurobiology of Disease. 2016 Apr;88:96-106. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.nbd.2016.01.009

BibTeX
@article{dd3cbf40a3854df1a27a32cbe2fccef8,
title = “Climbing fibers in spinocerebellar ataxia: A mechanism for the loss of motor control”,
keywords = “Animals, Cerebellum, Humans, Movement Disorders, Nerve Fibers, Spinocerebellar Ataxias, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’t, Review”,
author = “Smeets, {C J L M} and Verbeek, {D S}”,
note = “Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.”,
year = “2016”,
month = “4”,
doi = “10.1016/j.nbd.2016.01.009”,
volume = “88”,
pages = “96–106”,
journal = “Neurobiology of Disease”,
issn = “0969-9961”,
publisher = “ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE”,
}
RIS
TY - JOUR
T1 - Climbing fibers in spinocerebellar ataxia
T2 - Neurobiology of Disease
AU - Smeets,C J L M
AU - Verbeek,D S
N1 - Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
PY - 2016/4
Y1 - 2016/4
N2 -

The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) form an ever-growing group of neurodegenerative disorders causing dysfunction of the cerebellum and loss of motor control in patients. Currently, 41 different genetic causes have been identified, with each mutation affecting a different gene. Interestingly, these diverse genetic causes all disrupt cerebellar function and produce similar symptoms in patients. In order to understand the disease better, and define possible therapeutic targets for multiple SCAs, the field has been searching for common ground among the SCAs. In this review, we discuss the physiology of climbing fibers and the possibility that climbing fiber dysfunction is a point of convergence for at least a subset of SCAs.


AB -

The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) form an ever-growing group of neurodegenerative disorders causing dysfunction of the cerebellum and loss of motor control in patients. Currently, 41 different genetic causes have been identified, with each mutation affecting a different gene. Interestingly, these diverse genetic causes all disrupt cerebellar function and produce similar symptoms in patients. In order to understand the disease better, and define possible therapeutic targets for multiple SCAs, the field has been searching for common ground among the SCAs. In this review, we discuss the physiology of climbing fibers and the possibility that climbing fiber dysfunction is a point of convergence for at least a subset of SCAs.


KW - Animals
KW - Cerebellum
KW - Humans
KW - Movement Disorders
KW - Nerve Fibers
KW - Spinocerebellar Ataxias
KW - Journal Article
KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’t
KW - Review
U2 - 10.1016/j.nbd.2016.01.009
DO - 10.1016/j.nbd.2016.01.009
M3 - Article
VL - 88
SP - 96
EP - 106
JO - Neurobiology of Disease
JF - Neurobiology of Disease
SN - 0969-9961
ER -

http://www.rug.nl/research/portal/publications/climbing-fibers-in-spinocerebellar-ataxia(dd3cbf40-a385-4df1-a27a-32cbe2fccef8)/export.html

No wonder there isn’t an easy cure, our condition is very complicated. Personally, I can’t imagine my cerebellum ‘recovering or renewing’ after atrophy. But, ‘climbing fibers’ sounds inspiring, like new growth🤔xB